New Client Center

Welcome to TLC

We welcome you to Tender Loving Care Animal Hospital and we look forward to serving you and caring for your pet! We want to give you compassionate care using the most up to date knowledge and skills in a quality facility. Always let us know if you have any questions or concerns.

Tender Loving Care is a full service animal hospital that offers annual comprehensive physical exams, customized vaccine protocols for your pet, complete surgical and anesthesia facilities, pain management, radiology, electrocardiograms, laboratory diagnostics (feline leukemia/FIV testing, heartworm testing, blood work, urinalysis, cytology, histopathology), a pharmacy for your pet’s prescriptions, maintenance and prescription foods, intensive care in-hospital treatment, and dentistry services (dental radiographs, periodontal and endodontic work), geriatric care, behavioral counseling (canine and feline), obedience classes and pre-adoption education before you adopt or purchase a new pet.

We work in close association with referral clinics when more in-depth diagnostics are needed (ultrasound, endoscopy, MRI, etc.). We also work in conjunction with internal medicine specialists, orthopedic and soft tissue surgeons, ophthalmologists, dermatologists, and radiologists.
We can personally recommend behavioral trainers in our area for your puppies and adult dogs.

In case of an emergency, you can call our hospital first, but if we are unavailable, there are three area 24-hour animal emergency clinics that we work with.

You and your pets are our priority at Tender Loving Care. We strive to keep you well informed and educated about your pet’s care while practicing the highest quality care. We want you and your pets to have all available options presented to you and then together we can decide what the best choices are given the pet’s condition and circumstances, the pet’s comfort, economic considerations and your wishes. After all, we all want what is best for your pet from your pet’s perspective, too.

Payment is expected at time services are rendered. We accept cash, checks, Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express. There is also Care Credit-ask us for details. Pet health insurance is also available. On any bills over 30 days, we charge a finance fee of 1.5% ($5 minimum) per month on all unpaid balances. Estimates are available upon request.

New Client Form

If you are new to our practice, please print and fill out a New Client Form and bring it, along with your pet’s records, to your appointment. We look forward to meeting you!

Download New Client Form
 

 

Canine Wellness

Well-Puppy/Adult Dog Health Program:

At each and every visit your dog is given a full physical exam and all of your questions and concerns are addressed. Understanding your canine’s health care is the most important step in keeping them healthy.

1. DHPP VACCINE (distemper, hepatitis, parainfluenza, parvovirus)

These viruses can attack the neology system, liver, upper respiratory system and gastrointestinal system with possible fatal consequences. Your puppy needs a series of these vaccines. The first vaccine of the series is given at approximately 4-6 weeks. Your puppy needs a dhpp every 3 weeks until 16-18 weeks of age. The following year a dhpp booster is given then every 3 years to maintain your dog’s immunity. This vaccine is administered subcutaneously over the left shoulder.

2. LEPTOSPIROSIS VACCINE

Your puppy needs a series of two of these vaccines given at a 3 week interval. The first is given as early as 12 weeks of age. An annual leptospirosis booster is given to maintain your adult dog’s immunity. Leptospirosis is transmitted by the urine of wildlife (raccoons, rodents, opossum, etc.) and leads to renal disease which may be fatal. People are also susceptible to leptospirosis. This vaccine is administered subcutaneously over the right hip.

3. BORDETELLA VACCINE

Your puppy needs a series of these vaccines; the first is given at approximately 6 weeks of age and is administered as an intranasal vaccine. Then this is followed with a series of two injectable bordetella vaccines started 3 weeks after the first intranasal. This vaccine needs to be boostered at least once a year. If your pet has a high risk of exposure, then it may need to be boostered every 6 months. Bordetella is a highly contagious upper respiratory bacteria and it is best to prevent than to have to treat. Although bordetella if often required by boarding kennels and grooming salons, pets can be exposed by any dog at any time—-walking along the sidewalk, dog parks, or even waiting in the veterinary reception room. Pets are contagious before they are even showing signs.

4. RABIES VACCINE

Your puppy is given a one-year rabies vaccination at about 12 weeks of age. Your adult dog is given a 3 year booster the following year and every 3 years thereafter.

5. LYME VACCINE

Your dog’s Lyme vaccines consist of a series of two vaccines given at a 3 week interval. The first is given as early as 12 weeks of age. Your adult dog is given an annual Lyme vaccine to maintain immunity. In the last several years, Ohio has experienced an explosion in its tick population and so epidemiologists anticipate a significant increase in tick borne diseases including Lyme disease. Depending on whether your pet travel, hikes, hunt, etc. your dog may even be at an increased risk. In addition to the Lyme vaccine, additional tick prevention and control measures also need to be taken and needs to be discusses with your doctor.

6. INFLUENZA VACCINE

You need to consider a series of these vaccines. Influenza is a contagious respiratory virus. Some kennels and groomer require this vaccination. It can strike in certain locales without warning.

7. INTESTINAL PARASITES

Your puppy is dewormed every 3 weeks starting at 4-6 weeks of age ad up until at least 16 weeks of age. Fecal samples need to be checked at least every visit. The stool sample is checked for roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms, giardia and coccidia. Intestinal parasites can also be transmitted to people if proper precautions are not taken. A fecal should be checked at least every 6 months. Fecal testing also needs to be performs any time they are experiencing vomiting, diarrhea, or scooting. Once your pet’s intestinal worm treatment is complete, at least two negative fecal need to be confirmed at a 3 week interval.

8. HEARTWORM

Your puppy is prescribed a monthly heartworm preventative at the first visit. Since your puppy is quickly growing and since the heartworm preventative dose is based on weight, only one dose is dispensed per visit. Once your puppy reaches his/her adult weight, the rest of the puppy’s prescription can be dispensed.

The heartworm preventative is given year-round. The first heartworm blood test is performed at approximately 7 months of age and an annual heartworm test is required before renewing the prescription.

NOTE: if you ever forget to give a heartworm tablet, notify the hospital immediately. The heartworm tablets are to be given on the same date each month year round. Never stop and then restart the heartworm tablets without checking with the veterinarian first. There is also the option of an INJECTABLE 6 MONTH HEARTWORM PREVENTION once your pet reaches 6 months of age. It is a safe, effective alternative to monthly tablets and in this way you can never forget to give the heartworm prevention.

9. FLEA/TICK/MOSQUITO PREVENTION

Your dog’s safe flea/tick/mosquito protection needs to be started immediately. Ask the doctor which products would be best for your pet. Prevention is given monthly and year round.

10. SPAYING/NEUTERING

The spay or neuter surgical procedure should be performed around 5-6 months of age. A spay should ideally be performed before the first heat cycle, but can be performed afterwards. Spaying significantly reduces the risk of breast cancer, uterine and ovarian cancers, and life-threatening uterine infections called pyometra. Neutering eliminates the risk of testicular cancer and greatly reduces the risk of prostate cancer. Greater benefits are obtained if the surgery is performed sooner rather than later. Spaying and neutering also significantly reduces the incidence of urine marking issues.

Feline Wellness

Well Kitten/Adult Cat Health Program:

At each and every visit, your kitten is given a full physical exam and all of your questions and concerns are addressed. Understanding your kitten’s health care is the most important step in keeping your kitten healthy.

We encourage owners to keep their cats as strictly indoor cats because of the life-threatening risks of disease, injury, exposure to toxins, etc. by not doing so. If you do not plan on keeping your cat strictly indoors, please let us know so we can discuss additional medical considerations for your pet.

1. FELINE LEUKEMIA/FIV (Feline Immunodeficiency Virus) TESTING

Your kitten needs to be blood tested for these two deadly viruses at the very first visit. If your kitten is under 12 weeks of age at the time of the first testing, we highly recommend re-testing in 2 months. Also, pending your cat’s medical history, retesting may be recommended at 5-6 months at time of spay/neuter. Also, if your cat is indoors/outdoors or lives with other indoor/outdoor cats, annual feleuk/fiv testing is recommended. Often pets are retested again when presenting with certain signs of illness. Whether your pet is a kitten or an adult, it can take up to 2 months after exposure for your cat’s test to show positive results. Remember to isolate all newly adopted kittens and cats until they are tested and a veterinarian approves exposure of newly adopted cat to your other cats.

2. RCP VACCINE: (rhinotracheitis, calici, panleukopenia)

Your kitten needs a series of vaccines. The first vaccine of the series is given at approximately 4-6 weeks of age. Your kitten needs the boosters repeated every 3 weeks until approximately 12 weeks of age. An annual RCP booster is given to maintain your adult cat’s immunity.

3. FELINE LEUKEMIA VACCINE

After your kitten has tested negative for feline leukemia virus, your kitten needs a series of two of these vaccines given at a 3-week interval. The first is given as early at 10 weeks of age. Your adult cat is given an annual feline leukemia booster to maintain immunity. Remember, even though your cat has been tested for feline leukemia and vaccinated against it, no vaccine can provide 100% protection from this deadly virus. Please keep your cat strictly indoors and let them have contact only with other strictly indoor cats that have been tested and vaccinated!

4. RABIES

Your kitten is given a one-year rabies vaccination at about 12 weeks of age. Your adult cat is given a rabies vaccine every year.

5. INTESTINAL PARASITES

Your kitten is de-wormed every 3 weeks starting at 4-6 weeks of age and up until at least 16 weeks of age. It is necessary to verify at least two consecutive negative fecal samples, so please bring in a fecal to each vaccine visit. Intestinal parasites can also infest people if proper precautions are not taken. A minimum of an annual fecal exam is recommended for indoor cats and if your cat spends any time outdoors, consult us for a regular quarterly de-worming protocol. An annual fecal is always recommended for adults and any time that they are experiencing vomiting or diarrhea.

6. FELINE HEARTWORM DISEASE

Cats, as well as dogs, are threatened by heartworm disease. Both indoor and outdoor cats are at risk. There is heartworm testing available as well as preventatives, and you should consider them seriously. Most treatment for feline heartworm disease is very risky and most often has fatal consequences; therefore the emphasis is on prevention. Although heartworm testing is recommended it is not required as it is with dogs to start monthly preventative. It only takes 1–2 heartworms to kill a cat!

7. FLEA PREVENTION

Your kitten’s safe flea protection needs to be started immediately and given on the same day every month.

8. SPAYING/NEUTERING/DECLAWING

The surgical procedures of spaying/neutering need to be performed at 6 months of age. They should be performed before your kitten comes into heat, but can be performed afterwards. Spaying significantly reduces the risk of breast cancer, uterine and ovarian cancer, and life-threatening uterine infections called pyometra. Greater benefits are attained if performed earlier rather than later.

Neutering and spaying significantly reduce the incidence of urine spraying and litter box elimination problems.

De-clawing is an optional surgical procedure and can be performed earlier than 6 months of age if needed. Otherwise, if de-clawing is opted for, the surgical procedure is performed at the same time as the neuter/spay.